Wet and Wild

I parked the car, and the first thing I thought was bloody hell. The wind was howling outside the car, which was rocking in the wind. The rain was hitting the side windows like little bullets.

I stepped out the car, and pulled my boots out, and my windproof changing into the boots on the far side of the car, out of the wind and rain, I considered my self nuts for going out in this. But I don’t care. I’m outside in the fresh air.

Walking along the path into the wind, my windproof doing its job and keeping the worst of the wind out, but th rain stinging my face, like sandpaper. It was 2 miles before the path became shelterd, and another half mile to the walkers shelter. I ploughed through, hating my self for forgetting my Lowe Alpine Moutain Cap.

In the warmth of the sheler I sat and watched the rain falling. During the summer, you cant really use these shelters due to swallows nesting in them, as evidenced by the nests in the eves, and the filth dropping from the timber roof frames where the fledglings sit. But for now they are a welcome respite from the wind and rain.I considured puttin ion water proofs, but as my legs are already wet, and very mud splatterd, I decided it was a dead idea. My windproof was also wet, but as it holds the warmth even when wet, I just decided to plod on. The rain had more or less stopped, it was very light rain if anything. Still noticable but nothing as bad as before.

Leaving the shelter and walked round the back, and up the hill. Not a very steep hill, but enough to remind me of how unfit I am. I stopped at the top and tried to pin point the noise of  a shotgun, I saw a Land rover on the hill, but couldn’t see any other obvious movement of shooters. A tractor was busy spreading hay for the fell sheep on the other side of the valley.

I doubled back, the way I had come, along a higher path. After all, this was purly a effort to check my leg for pain and see how it stood up to a rough walk. As I approached the only gate on this path, a all terrain motorcycle roared up to the gate, saw me walking and turned around and sped off the same way he had come. This path was open to all vehicles, it was re-classified by the authority a few years back, but the motorcycles still occasionally use it. Personnally I dont care. The road can take the traffic, its heavy stoned, and motor bikes cause little damage. If they where to start ripping up areas off the path however, thats when it becomes a issue.

I walked the road, finding new and interesting rounds around many of the stupidly deep huge puddles all over.

Scar House was thundering, the first time I’ve seen the dam outflows in full force, raging down the Nidd. As I walked back to the car, I passed a couple, dressed in full waterproofs, hoods up and zipped right up. They looked me up and down, and gave me a look reminisant of upper class looking down on the commoner. I dont care, aprt from being damp, I was fine. Warm and comfy. Given the weather, I would hazard a guess, after climbing Cam High Road onto the fell, they would be damp too, only from the inside out. I sniggerd and walked on.

Back to the car, I sat and had a coffee. I enjoy every walk, in all weathers.

Pete Postlethwaite

Has sadly died.

He was one of the great English actors, and his name was attached to many significant films in recent times. He was a greatly talented actor, who will be sadly be missed to all that knew him, and worked with him.

Never spoilt by the riches acting brought, he was a down to earth man, who could often be found in the local pub, and always had time for people.

From the Independent:

The actor had continued to work until recent months despite receiving treatment for cancer.

His family has requested that the media respect their privacy.

Mr Postlethwaite, who was made an OBE in the 2004 New Year’s Honours List, was described by Hollywood director Steven Spielberg as “the best actor in the world”. They worked together on The Lost World: Jurassic Park and Amistad.

In response to the praise, Mr Postlethwaite joked: “I’m sure what Spielberg actually said was, ‘the thing about Pete is that he thinks he’s the best actor in the world’.”

Mr Postlethwaite received his Oscar nomination for his performance as Guiseppe Conlon in the 1993 film In The Name Of The Father, about the wrongful convictions of the so-called Guildford Four for an IRA bomb attack.

In it he starred alongside his friend and fellow actor Daniel Day-Lewis and Emma Thompson.

Mr Postlethwaite and Mr Day-Lewis had previously worked together in repertory theatre in Bristol during the 1970s.

Pete Postlethwaite’s other films included Brassed Off, The Usual Suspects, The Shipping News, Inception, Romeo & Juliet and The Town.

Born in Warrington, he had originally planned to be a priest. He later became a teacher but eventually followed his passion for the stage, beginning his career at the Everyman Theatre in Liverpool where he rubbed shoulders with such future stars as Bill Nighy, Julie Walters, Alan Bleasdale, Jonathan Pryce, Matthew Kelly and Anthony Sher.

In 2008 he returned to the Everyman to play the lead in King Lear, a role that he had always wanted to play.

The performance was one of the highlights of Liverpool’s year as the European Capital of Culture.

Mr Postlethwaite was also a political activist who marched against the war in Iraq, supported the Make Poverty History campaign and starred in the 2009 film about global warming, The Age of Stupid.

He also adapted his home to become environmentally-responsible, installing a wind turbine and other features.

He is survived by his wife, Jacqui, his son Will and daughter, Lily.

Mr Postlethwaite, who lived in rural Shropshire near the Welsh border, was treated at the Royal Shrewsbury Hospital.

He recently paid tribute to the staff there, telling the Shropshire Star: “They have been wonderful and I am grateful to them.

“I cannot thank them enough for everything that they have done for me.”

So long Pete, Rest well.